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When opening a pull request from a comparison that only includes one commit, GitHub defaults the title and description to the subject line and body of that commit's message. Authors who write detailed git commit messages that adhere to the widely accepted convention of wrapping at 72 characters per line may have noticed that this can result in strange formatting because of how GitHub Flavored Markdown treats newlines.

We now take and automatically reformat the commit message when suggesting the pull request description, making it look just as good as the commit message it came from when viewed on github.com, GitHub Mobile, and other tools.

An image of a PR being opened before and after this change

Learn more about Creating Pull Requests

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Previously, we announced a change to how <num> parameters work for autolink references, switching from numeric to alphanumeric IDs. We heard from a number of customers who still need numeric identifiers. Now when creating an autolink reference, you can use an alphanumeric or numeric identifier.

Screenshot of Autolink references

Autolinks are available in repositories with GitHub Pro, GitHub Team, GitHub Enterprise Cloud, and GitHub Enterprise Server. For more information, see GitHub's products.

Learn more about autolinks at Configure autolinks in the GitHub documentation. We appreciate feedback on this and other topics in GitHub's public feedback discussions.

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In May we shipped a setting for including the pull request title in the default commit message presented to users when squash merging a pull request. We just shipped more options for customizing the default commit message, including using the pull request's description! You can also now customize the default commit messages for merge commit merges. The goal is more predictable, consistent, and useful commit messages for your pull requests, which translate to a more useful Git commit history.

How it works

From repository settings, a maintainer or admin can choose the default format for commit messages produced when merging pull requests:
image

This selection is used to form a default commit message that gets presented to users on the pull request page when merging a pull request. For example, assume Default to pull request title and description is selected and a user clicks to merge a pull request with this description:
image

The default commit message will include the pull request's title and description:
image

The user can then accept this commit message or make changes before merging.

Options

For merge commit merging:

  • Default message: pull request number and head branch on the first line; pull request title on the third line
  • Pull request title: pull request title and number on the first line
  • Pull request title and description: pull request title and number on the first line; pull request description starting on the third line

For squash merging:

  • Default message: commit title and commit message (if the pull request contains a single commit), or the pull request title and number and list of commits (if the pull request contains multiple commits)
  • Pull request title: pull request title and number on the first line
  • Pull request title and commit details: pull request title and number on the first line; commit message (if a single commit) or list of commits (if multiple commits)
  • Pull request title and description: pull request title and number on the first line; pull request description starting on the third line

Additional details

If no message is provided when merging a pull request using the REST API or GraphQL mutation, a default commit message will be formed based on the selected message format and merge method.

The default message format can be managed using the Create a repository or Update a repository REST APIs. See the merge_commit_title, merge_commit_message, and squash_merge_commit_title, squash_merge_commit_message parameters.

Feedback

We want to hear from you! Tell us what you think and how we can make it better: https://github.com/orgs/community/discussions/30439

Learn more

Learn more about configuring merge commit merging and configuring squash merging.

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This feature is available to repositories enrolled in the Pull Request Merge Queue beta.

A new webhook event and GitHub Actions workflow trigger (merge_group) makes it easier to run required status checks on merge groups created by merge queue. A merge group includes the changes from one or more pull requests and must pass the status checks required by the target branch.

A merge_group webhook event, which currently has one supported action (checks_requested), is sent after a merge group is created and informs receivers, including GitHub Actions, when status checks are needed on the merge group. The event payload includes head_sha, the commit SHA that should be validated and have status reported on using check runs or commit statuses. For GitHub Actions, status is reported automatically at the conclusion of jobs in the triggered workflow.

To trigger a GitHub Actions workflow for a merge group, the merge_group trigger should be used. The following example triggers on individual pull requests and merge groups targeting the main branch:

# Trigger this workflow on individual pull requests and merge groups that target the `main` branch
on:
  pull_request:
    branches: [ main ]
  merge_group:
    branches: [ main ]

A push event is still sent when a merge group branch is created, and will trigger a GitHub Actions workflow. However, unlike a merge_group event, a push event does not include the target branch of the merge group.

Learn more about using merge queue.

Learn more about the new GitHub Actions merge_group workflow trigger and the merge_group webhook event.

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You can now create a custom role to bypass branch protections without having to grant the Admin role. Previously, to bypass branch protections you had to be an Admin which provides additional permissions that may not be needed. For tighter control of Admin permissions, you can now craft a custom role that has the Bypass branch protections permission, allowing just the right amount of access.

Image of Custom roles Inherited from Maintain role that adds the new Bypass branch protections permission

To enforce branch protections for all Admins and roles with the "Bypass branch protections" permission, enable Do not allow bypassing the above settings in your branch protection rules.

Image of checkbox selecting Do not allow bypassing the above settings

This permission differs from the Push commits to protected branches permission, which allows pushing to a protected branch, but branch protection rules will still apply and could result in a push being denied.

For more information, visit Managing custom repository roles for an organization in the GitHub documentation.

We appreciate feedback on this and other topics in GitHub's public feedback discussions.

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Code review on GitHub has evolved a lot since we introduced the ability to comment on an individual commit in 2008. Users today can propose a change using a pull request, which provides a first-class experience for reviewing, discussing, evolving, and ultimately accepting or rejecting a change. While pull requests are the recommended way to review and discuss proposed changes, commenting on individual commits is still currently supported.

We recently rolled out a change to no longer show comments added to individual commits (comments added outside the context of a pull request) on the pull request timeline. Previously, if a pull request happened to include a commit that had commit comments, those comments would appear on that pull request’s timeline. Users often reported that these comments were irrelevant to the pull request or caused confusion when added by someone not involved in the review.

Note: this change does not impact the ability for users to comment on individual commits or review a pull request one commit at a time.

Comparing commit comments and review comments

To help understand this change, let’s compare commit comments with pull request review comments.

A commit comment is a comment added by a GitHub user to an individual commit or to a line of a file changed in a commit. Commit comments are stored on GitHub and surface in various places in the GitHub UI, including at the bottom of the commit page (/:org/:repo/commit/:sha):

image

A commit comment is associated with a commit. A commit comment cannot be added from the pull request page and cannot be replied to or resolved like a pull request review comment because it does not belong to the pull request. A commit comment can be indirectly associated with a pull request if that pull request includes the commit.

A pull request review comment is a comment added by a GitHub user to a changed line (or the lines surrounding it) in a pull request. Review comments are usually added from the Files changed or Commits tab of the pull request page and are directly associated with the pull request.

image

Unlike commit comments, pull request review comments do not surface outside the context of the pull request since they belong to the pull request.

What changed

Prior to this change, comments on individual commits (made outside the context of the pull request) would appear in the timeline of any pull request that included that commit:

image

With this change, commit comments (like the highlighted 029541b comment) no longer appear in the pull request timeline.

The timeline events REST and GraphQL APIs also no longer return commit comments associated with any commits included in the pull request.

What did not change

This change did not impact a user’s ability to add, view, or manage comments on individual commits.

  • Users can still add comments to individual commits or changed lines in a commit
    image
  • Users can still review pull requests one commit at a time and add review comments
  • Commit comments still surface on the commits listing page
    image
  • Commit comments still surface at the bottom of the commit page
  • Commit comments are still accessible from the Commits tab of the pull request page
    image
  • Commits pushed to a pull request head branch still surface in the timeline and on the Commits tab of the pull request page

There was also no impact to commit messages, i.e. the message stored with the Git commit. Commit messages continue to surface everywhere they previously surfaced, including on the pull request page.

We want to hear from you

If you have feedback or questions about this change, let us know here: https://github.com/orgs/community/discussions/28924

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Previously, when creating an autolink reference for a repository, you could only use a numeric identifier in the <num> parameter. This format didn't support integration with platforms that use alphanumeric identifiers, like the last segment of this Trello card URL: https://trello.com/c/3eZr2Bxw. Now you can create an autolink with an alphanumeric identifier.

Any previously created autolinks will continue to support only numeric identifiers so that they continue working as before. Only newly created autolinks will support alphanumeric identifiers.

Autolinks are available in repositories with GitHub Pro, GitHub Team, GitHub Enterprise Cloud, and GitHub Enterprise Server. For more information, see GitHub's products.

Learn more about autolinks at Configure autolinks in the GitHub documentation. We appreciate feedback on this and other topics in GitHub's public feedback discussions.

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Pull Requests will now load more quickly thanks to deferred syntax highlighting.

When you first land on a Pull Request’s Conversation or Files tab we will show plain text diffs, and then swap in the syntax highlighted versions as soon as they are ready.

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Code scanning flags up potential security vulnerabilities in pull requests — well before code is merged and deployed. Starting today, such alerts will be more visible: they will appear as a review on the pull request Conversation tab. As with any review, developers can then have a conversation about specific areas of the code that was changed.

And of course, from the code review by the GitHub code scanning bot, you can dive deeper into the alert: view the details, check the data flow paths, and dismiss an alert.

Code scanning alert

Code scanning and branch protection rules

Users were already able to configure code scanning as a required check in the branch protection settings in a repository.

With the new code scanning functionality, developers can start a conversation about code scanning alerts. Branch protection rules that require all conversations to be resolved before a PR can be merged apply equally to conversations about code scanning alerts: as soon as a code reviewer comments on a code scanning alert, the PR can not be merged until the conversation is marked as resolved. This helps ensure comments made on alerts are addressed prior to merging.

As you'd expect, when an alert is fixed, the conversation around the alert gets resolved and the PR can be merged.

PR merge blocked because of unresolved conversation

Learn more about GitHub Advanced Security and code scanning.

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You can now enable debug logging when you re-run jobs in a GitHub Actions workflow run. This gives you additional information about the job's execution and its environment which can help you diagnose failures.

To enable debug logging, select "Enable debug logging" in the re-run dialog.

Re-run dialog screenshot

You can also enable debug logging using the API or the command-line client.

For more details see
Re-running workflows and jobs.

For questions, visit the GitHub Actions community.

To see what's next for Actions, visit our public roadmap.

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We've made some updates to how paste formatting works in Markdown-enabled fields on GitHub. For example, in code editors and on gists, you'll now be able to paste URLs on selected texts that will render as Markdown links like [...](https://...) by using the keyboard shortcut cmd|ctrl + v.

The following paste formatting changes have been made to pull requests, issue comments and wikis:

  • Spreadsheet cells and HTML tables will render as Markdown tables
  • Any copied text containing links will render the links in Markdown

All of this formatting can be disabled when pasting using the keyboard shortcut: cmd|ctl + shift + v or cmd|ctl + shift + Alt + v.

markdown formatting demo gif

Learn more about writing and formatting at GitHub.

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Previously, some branch protections only allowed exceptions to be granted to users and teams. Now, GitHub Apps can also be granted exceptions to any branch protection that supports exceptions.

Admins can create branch protection rules to enforce certain workflows for branches, such as requiring a pull request before changes can be merged to a branch. This is a good practice, but you may want to make exceptions to a rule for specific people, teams, or GitHub Apps. For example, if you have a GitHub App that calls GitHub APIs to make changes in a repository, you may want to permit that App to make changes without creating a pull request. Previously, these exceptions could be granted to people and teams, but only some protections allowed GitHub Apps.

Now, branch protections that previously only allowed exceptions for people and teams also support GitHub Apps. When admins configure these branch protections, they can choose from a list of GitHub Apps that are installed and authorized for the repository, as shown here:

Image of adding a GitHub App as an exception to a branch protection setting

For information about branch protection rules, visit Managing a branch protection rule.

For information about GitHub Apps, visit About GitHub Apps.

We appreciate feedback on this and other topics in GitHub's public feedback discussions.

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We've added an enhancement to the repository view for a branch that is different than its upstream branch. Previously we showed the number of commits the branch was ahead or behind the upstream, but there wasn't an easy way to show the differences. Now you can click a link that takes you to a comparison page to see the differences.

image

Note: there is a different link for ahead versus behind

  • ahead represents changes your branch has but the upstream branch does not
  • behind represents changes the upstream branch has but your branch does not

Read more about branches.

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To further reduce the risk of a user using Actions to merge a change into a protected branch that was not reviewed by another person, the organization setting to disallow Actions from approving pull requests, which was introduced in January 2022, has been extended to also limit Actions from creating pull requests.

The Allow GitHub Actions to create and approve pull requests setting can be managed by admins in organization settings under Actions > General > Workflow permissions.

image

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You can now require a successful deployment of a branch before its pull request can be merged. This is made possible by a new branch protection setting titled Require deployments to succeed before merging. To enable the setting, create a new branch protection rule for the target branch. Then, select the environments where deployments must succeed before a pull request can be merged, shown here:

image

This will allow you to ensure code is, for example, exercised in a staging or test environment before it's merged to your main branch.

Learn more about protected branches
Learn more about branch protection rules

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Previously, GitHub's web UI did not allow deleting a branch that was associated with an open pull request. Now you can delete such a branch from the UI. However, doing so will close all open pull requests associated with the branch. Before the branch is deleted, you must confirm that the pull requests may be closed.

Confirm deleting a branch

Read more about working with branches.

Read more about collaborating with pull requests.

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Today, we are announcing the beta of the new file tree experience for pull requests!

  • Jump between files more quickly
  • Understand the size and scope of the change before you start reviewing
  • Focus your review by filtering the tree on part of a file or folder name

How to use the tree

On the Files changed tab of a pull request, click a file in the tree to see its changes.

PR Files Changed tab showing tree

To filter the tree, type into the Filter changed files text input. File names matching this input and all files under a folder name matching this input will be shown. You can also filter the tree by file extension, viewed or not, owned by you or your team, and more using the File filter menu.

To hide or show the tree, click the toggle button above the tree.

Note: The file tree only appears if the pull request has at least 2 changed file and your browser window is sufficiently wide. During the beta, you can disable the tree completely via the feature preview dialog. When disabled, you will no longer have the option to hide or show the tree from the pull request page. If you change your mind, you can re-enable the tree in the feature preview dialog.

We want to hear from you

Join the public discussion and tell us what you like and don't like about the new file tree.

Learn more

Learn more about reviewing proposed changes and filtering files in a pull request.

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A CODEOWNERS file defines the users or teams responsible for different parts of your repository, and helps ensure the right people are included in pull request reviews. We've shipped some improvements that make it easier to work with CODEOWNERS!

Surfacing syntax errors

Syntax errors are now surfaced when viewing a CODEOWNERS file from the web. Previously, when a line in a CODEOWNERS file had a syntax error, it would be ignored or in some cases cause the entire CODEOWNERS file to not load.

Screenshot of a CODEOWNERS file with errors

GitHub Apps and Actions can access the same list of errors using new REST and GraphQL APIs.

See which CODEOWNERS will be requested for review

When creating a new pull request or after pushing new changes to a draft pull request, any CODEOWNERS that will be requested for review are now listed:

Screenshot of pending reviewers on a draft PR

This gives you an early look at who will be requested to review once the pull request is marked ready for review.

Comment on the same line

Comments in CODEOWNERS files can now appear at the end of a line, not just on their own line:

*.js    @js-owner       # All JavaSript files

Learn more about CODEOWNERS files.

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GitHub can display several common image formats, including PNG, JPG, GIF, PSD, and SVG, and provides several ways to compare differences between versions. Now when reviewing added or changed images in a pull request, previews of those images are shown by default:

image

Previously, you would see a message indicating that binary files could not be shown and you would need to toggle the "Display rich diff" option.

Learn more about working with non-code files.

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