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The Source Imports REST API allows integrators to programatically import internet-accessible Git repositories into GitHub.com – for example, from code hosting platforms like Bitbucket Cloud or GitLab.com.

We're ending support for this API due to very low levels of usage and available alternatives. From 00:00 UTC on April 12, 2024, these endpoints will return an error. Integrators affected by this change will receive email alerts ahead of this deprecation.

If you're using the Source Imports API, you'll need to update your integration by that date, or it will stop working. You can learn about alternatives to this API on the new "Programatically importing repositories" page on the GitHub Docs.

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We're making changes to the IP addresses used by GitHub Enterprise Importer for outbound network connections.

If you're using GitHub Enterprise Importer to run migrations, you will need to add our new IP range to the following IP allow lists, if enabled:

  • The IP allow list on your destination GitHub.com organization or enterprise
  • If you're running migrations from GitHub.com, the IP allow list on your source GitHub.com organization or enterprise
  • If you're running migrations from a GitHub Enterprise Server, Bitbucket Server or Bitbucket Data Center instance, the allow list on your configured Azure Blob Storage or Amazon S3 storage account
  • If you're running migrations from Azure DevOps, the allow list on your Azure DevOps organization

This changes will take affect at 00:00 UTC on November 8, 2023. If you don't update your IP allow lists by this date, migrations may stop working.

Users who have run migrations using GitHub Enterprise Importer in the past 90 days will receive email alerts about this change.

For a full list of our IP ranges and more information, see "Configuring IP allow lists for migrations" in the GitHub Docs (https://docs.github.com/en/migrations/using-github-enterprise-importer/preparing-to-migrate-with-github-enterprise-importer/managing-access-for-github-enterprise-importer#configuring-ip-allow-lists-for-migrations).

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After a successful public beta, we're launching support for Bitbucket Server and Bitbucket Data Center migrations in GitHub Enterprise Importer.

You can now easily use GitHub Enterprise Importer to migrate your source code, revision history, pull requests, reviews and comments when moving to GitHub from your self-hosted Bitbucket instance.

To learn more about the benefits of switching from Bitbucket to GitHub, check our brand new blog post.

For a step-by-step guide on migrating from Bitbucket Server or Bitbucket Data Center, check out "Migrating repositories from Bitbucket Server to GitHub Enterprise Cloud" in the GitHub Docs.

If you have feedback or questions, please join our Community Discussion.

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GitHub Actions Importer now supports migrations from Bitbucket, Bamboo Server, and Bamboo Data Center. Companies using those tools can plan, test, and automate the migration of pipelines to GitHub Actions more easily than ever before.

GitHub Actions Importer is available via the GitHub CLI or IssueOps. To get started, please visit our docs. For questions and feedback, check out the GitHub Actions Importer community.

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We're making changes to the IP addresses used by GitHub Enterprise Importer for outbound network connections. These changes will take affect at 00:00 UTC on September 18, 2023.

If you're running migrations with GitHub Enterprise Importer and you have IP allowlisting enabled on your migration source or target, or an Azure Blob Storage or Amazon S3 account which you use for migrations, then you'll need to update your allow list.

For a full list of our IP ranges and more information, see "Configuring IP allow lists for migrations" in the GitHub Docs (https://docs.github.com/en/migrations/using-github-enterprise-importer/preparing-to-migrate-with-github-enterprise-importer/managing-access-for-github-enterprise-importer#configuring-ip-allow-lists-for-migrations).

Owners of organizations affected by this change were already sent an email notification on August 18, 2023, providing 30 days' notice.

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When you migrate to GitHub.com with GitHub Enterprise Importer, user activity (e.g. issues, pull requests, comments) is linked to placeholder identities called "mannequins".

After you've finished migrating, you can "reclaim" those mannequins, linking the migrated activity to users' GitHub.com accounts. As part of this process, users receive invitations, asking them to accept the mannequin attribution.

Now, organizations using Enterprise Managed Users (EMU) can reclaim mannequins immediately, skipping the invitation process. This can be done one-by-one, or in bulk using a CSV.

To use this new feature, you'll need to update to the new v1.0.0 version of the GitHub Enterprise Importer CLI, released today.

For more details, see "Reclaiming mannequins for GitHub Enterprise Importer" in the GitHub Docs.

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Today, we're launching public beta support for Bitbucket Server and Bitbucket Data Center migrations in GitHub Enterprise Importer.

You can now easily use GitHub Enterprise Importer to migrate your source code, revision history, pull requests, reviews and comments when moving to GitHub from your self-hosted Bitbucket instance.

For a step-by-step guide on migrating from Bitbucket Server or Bitbucket Data Center, check out "Migrating repositories from Bitbucket Server to GitHub Enterprise Cloud" in the GitHub Docs.

We'd love to hear your feedback and questions; join us in the Community Discussion!

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Today, we're launching a new brand new tool for migrating from other code hosting platforms to GitHub and between GitHub products: GitHub Enterprise Importer (GEI).

With GitHub Enterprise Importer, you can migrate to GitHub.com or GitHub Enterprise Cloud and bring your source code and collaboration history (for example code reviews and comments) with you.

We’re publicly launching GitHub Enterprise Importer today — but already, it has been used by over 2,000 customers to migrate more than 400,000 repositories to GitHub Enterprise Cloud.

Today, we support the following migrations paths:

  • Azure DevOps to GitHub.com
  • GitHub Enterprise Server to GitHub.com
  • Moving your existing GitHub.com repos to an enterprise with Enterprise Managed Users enabled

Next up, we'll be launching support for migrations from Bitbucket Server and Bitbucket Data Center. If you're interested, you can sign up for our private beta here.

To learn more, head over to "Using GitHub Enterprise Importer" in the docs and check out our blog post.

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GitHub Importer allows you to import repositories from other code hosting platforms to GitHub.com using a UI or REST API.

Today, GitHub Importer supports Git, Mercurial, Subversion and Team Foundation Version Control (TFVC) repositories.

From April 12, 2024, we will no longer support importing Mercurial, Subversion and Team Foundation Version Control (TFVC) repositories. We’re ending support for this functionality due to extremely low levels of usage.

Even without GitHub Importer, moving from these alternative version control systems to Git is simple thanks to fantastic open source tools – for more details, read our Docs article, “Using the command line to import source code”.

EDIT: The original end of support date in this post was October 17, 2023. We delayed this change in order to give customers more time to adapt.

 

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