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Previously, some branch protections only allowed exceptions to be granted to users and teams. Now, GitHub Apps can also be granted exceptions to any branch protection that supports exceptions.

Admins can create branch protection rules to enforce certain workflows for branches, such as requiring a pull request before changes can be merged to a branch. This is a good practice, but you may want to make exceptions to a rule for specific people, teams, or GitHub Apps. For example, if you have a GitHub App that calls GitHub APIs to make changes in a repository, you may want to permit that App to make changes without creating a pull request. Previously, these exceptions could be granted to people and teams, but only some protections allowed GitHub Apps.

Now, branch protections that previously only allowed exceptions for people and teams also support GitHub Apps. When admins configure these branch protections, they can choose from a list of GitHub Apps that are installed and authorized for the repository, as shown here:

Image of adding a GitHub App as an exception to a branch protection setting

For information about branch protection rules, visit Managing a branch protection rule.

For information about GitHub Apps, visit About GitHub Apps.

We appreciate feedback on this and other topics in GitHub's public feedback discussions.

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We've added an enhancement to the repository view for a branch that is different than its upstream branch. Previously we showed the number of commits the branch was ahead or behind the upstream, but there wasn't an easy way to show the differences. Now you can click a link that takes you to a comparison page to see the differences.

image

Note: there is a different link for ahead versus behind

  • ahead represents changes your branch has but the upstream branch does not
  • behind represents changes the upstream branch has but your branch does not

Read more about branches.

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You can now require a successful deployment of a branch before its pull request can be merged. This is made possible by a new branch protection setting titled Require deployments to succeed before merging. To enable the setting, create a new branch protection rule for the target branch. Then, select the environments where deployments must succeed before a pull request can be merged, shown here:

image

This will allow you to ensure code is, for example, exercised in a staging or test environment before it's merged to your main branch.

Learn more about protected branches
Learn more about branch protection rules

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Previously, GitHub's web UI did not allow deleting a branch that was associated with an open pull request. Now you can delete such a branch from the UI. However, doing so will close all open pull requests associated with the branch. Before the branch is deleted, you must confirm that the pull requests may be closed.

Confirm deleting a branch

Read more about working with branches.

Read more about collaborating with pull requests.

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