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GitHub’s audit log streaming health check is now generally available! The purpose of the audit log health check is to ensure audit log streams do not fail silently. Every 24 hours, a health check runs for each stream. If a stream is set up incorrectly, an email will be sent to the enterprise owners as notification that their audit log stream is not properly configured.

Example email notification for misconfigured stream

Streamed audit logs are stored for up to seven days on GitHub.com. To avoid audit log events being dropped from the stream, a misconfigured stream must be fixed within six days of email notification. To fix your streaming configuration, follow the steps outlined in “Setting up audit log streaming.”

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Starting today for GitHub Enterprise Cloud and as part of GitHub Enterprise Server version 3.13, enterprise and organization audit log events will include the applicable SAML and SCIM identity data associated with the user. This data provides increased visibility into the identity of the user and enables logs from multiple systems to quickly and easily be linked using a common corporate identity. The SAML identity information will be displayed in the external_identity_nameid field and the SCIM identity data will be displayed in the external_identity_username field within the audit log payloads.

In GitHub Enterprise Cloud Classic, SAML SSO gives organization and enterprise owners a way to control and secure access to resources like repositories, issues, and pull requests. Organization owners can invite GitHub users to join an organization backed by SAML SSO, allowing users to become members of the organization while retaining their existing identity and contributions on GitHub.

If your Enterprise Cloud Classic organization uses SAML SSO, you can use SCIM to add, manage, and remove organization members’ access to your organization. For example, an administrator can deprovision an organization member using SCIM and automatically remove the member from the organization.

To learn more, read our documentation about SAML SSO authentication data in our audit logs.

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GitHub Enterprise and organization owners now have improved visibility into authentication activity via personal access token (classic), fine-grained personal access token (FGP), OAuth token, SSH key or deploy key. The audit log may now contain hashed renderings of the token or key used for authentication and the programmatic_access_type field describing the type of token/key used for authentication. Enterprise and organization owners can query by specific token or key to identify and track activity.

To learn more, read our documentation on identifying audit log events performed by an access token.

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GitHub Enterprise Cloud customers can now participate in a public beta displaying SAML single sign-on (SSO) identities for relevant users in audit log events.

SAML SSO gives organization and enterprise owners a way to control and secure access to resources like repositories, issues, and pull requests. Organization owners can invite GitHub users to join an organization backed by SAML SSO, allowing users to become members of the organization while retaining their existing identity and contributions on GitHub.

With the addition of SAML SSO identities in the audit log, organization and enterprise owners can easily link audit log activity with the user's corporate identity used to SSO into GitHub.com. This provides increased visibility into the identity of the user and enables logs from multiple systems to quickly and easily be linked using a common SAML identity.

To learn more, read our documentation about SAML SSO authentication data in our audit logs. Enterprise and organization owners can provide feedback at the logging SAML SSO authentication data for enterprise and org audit log events community discussion page.

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In October 2022, we released a private beta adding linked SAML single sign-on (SSO) identities for relevant users to GitHub Enterprise audit log events.

We are expanding the private beta to now include linked identities within git events, making this information available across all relevant events.

Enterprise owners interested in participating in the private beta should reach out to your GitHub account manager or contact our sales team to have this feature enabled for your enterprise. Once enabled, enterprise and organization owners can provide feedback at the logging SAML SSO authentication data for enterprise and org audit log events community discussion page.

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In early July, GitHub announced a new rate limit was coming for the audit log API endpoints. Starting today, each audit log API endpoint will impose a rate limit of 1,750 queries per hour per user, IP address, enterprise, or organization. This is higher than the previously stated change to 15 queries per minute, in order to allow integrators more time to adjust workflows and scripts which programmatically query the audit log API. We intend to enforce a limit of 15 queries per minute on or after November 1st, 2023.

This rate limit will be enforced on each combination of an individual user, IP address and entity path (/orgs/<org_name>/audit_log or /enterprises/<enterprise_name>/audit_log) independently.

To adapt to these changes and avoid rate limiting, programs or integrations querying the audit log API should query at a maximum frequency of 1,750 queries per hour. Additionally, applications querying the audit log API should be updated to honor HTTP 403 and 429 responses to dynamically adjust to the back-pressure exerted by GitHub.

For additional information, please consult our documentation on handling rate limits for requests from personal accounts and rate limits for GitHub Apps. Alternatively, enterprises seeking access to near real-time data should consider streaming your enterprise audit log.

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In April, we announced that GitHub Enterprise Cloud customers could join a public beta for streaming API request events as part of their enterprise audit log. As part of that release, REST API calls against enterprise's private and internal repositories could be streamed to one of GitHub's supported streaming endpoints.

However, we've discovered the need to expand our api call coverage against private and internal repositories in order to capture other security significant api routes. Additionally, we've determined several api routes targeting internal and private repositories generate significant event volumes with little auditing or security value. To address these concerns, we partnered with GitHub's security team to define a set of auditing and security significant controllers to serve as the basis for the public beta. These adjustments to the beta should increase signal and decrease the noise generated by the api request event being streamed.
image (4)

Note: hashed_token and token_id have been redacted for security reasons.

Enterprise owners interested in the public beta can still follow the instructions in our docs for enabling audit log streaming of API requests. We welcome feedback on the changes made to this feature on our beta feedback community discussion post.

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GitHub provides Enterprise customers with the ability to programmatically retrieve enterprise and organization audit log events in near real-time using the audit log API. A high-quality audit log is an essential tool used by enterprises to ensure compliance, maintain security, investigate issues, and promote accountability. To support these objectives, the audit log API needs to be highly reliable, consistently available, and extremely scalable.

Recognizing the audit log API's importance as a data source to enterprises, each audit log API endpoint will impose a rate limit of 15 queries per minute per enterprise or org starting August 1st, 2023. Based on a thorough analysis of event generation data, we are confident that the new rate limit will continue to support customers in accessing near real-time data via the audit log API. Additionally, query cost is a crucial consideration, and in the future, the audit log may impose further rate limiting for high-cost queries that place significant strain on our data stores.

What can you do to prepare for these changes? First, programs or integrations querying the audit log API should be adjusted to query at a maximum frequency of 15 queries per minute. Additionally, applications querying the audit log API should be updated to be capable of honoring HTTP 429 responses, enabling them to dynamically adjust to the back-pressure exerted by our systems. Alternatively, Enterprises seeking access to near real-time data should consider streaming your enterprise audit log.

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The Enterprise and Organization audit log UI and user security logs UI now include an expandable view that displays the full audit log payload of each event.

Customers can now see the same event metadata when searching your audit log via U/I, exporting audit logs to a JSON file, querying the audit log API, or streaming your audit logs to one of our supported streaming endpoints.

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GitHub Enterprises and Organzations can now join a private beta to try our new expandable event payload view in their audit log.

Screen_Recording_2023-04-27_at_12_22_29_PM_AdobeExpress (2)

We have gotten a lot of feedback that the information available in the audit log U/I is not the same as the data available in the audit log's exports, API and streaming payloads. In response, GitHub is adding a new expandable view of an event's payload in the audit log U/I. This brings data consistency to all the ways of consuming audit logs.

Enterprise and Organization owners interested in participating in the private beta should reach out to your GitHub account manager or contact our sales team to have this feature enabled. Make sure to let us know what you think using our beta feedback community discussion post.

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GitHub Enterprise Cloud customers can now join a public beta for streaming API request events as part of their enterprise audit log.

As part of this beta, REST API calls against enterprise's private and internal repositories can be streamed to one of GitHub's supported streaming endpoints.
image (4)

Note: hashed_token and token_id have been redacted for security reasons.

Many GitHub users leverage GitHub's APIs to extend and customize their GitHub experience. However, use of APIs can create unique security and operational challenges for Enterprises. With the introduction of targeted audit log streaming API requests, enterprise owners are now able to:

  • Better understand and analyze API usage targeting their private and internal repositories;
  • Identify and diagnose potentially misconfigured applications or integrations;
  • Identify the authentication tokens being used by specific applications or integrations;
  • Troubleshoot API contributing to API rate limiting;
  • Leverage API activity when performing forensic investigations; and
  • Develop API specific anomaly detection algorithms to identify potentially malicious API activity.

Enterprise owners interested in the public beta can follow the instructions in our docs for enabling audit log streaming of API requests. Once enabled, you should begin seeing API request events in your audit log stream. Feedback can be provided at our beta feedback community discussion post.

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GitHub organization owners can now opt-in to a public beta to display organization members' IP addresseses in audit logs events. When enabled, IP addresses will be displayed for all audit log events performed by organization members on organization assets other than public repositories, which will be treated differently due to privacy obligations.

The inclusion of IP addresses in audit logs helps software developers and administrators protect their systems and data from potential threats and improve their overall security posture by providing the source of an action or event within a system or network. This information is crucial for troubleshooting issues or investigating security incidents. IP addresses are often used in forensic investigations to trace the origin of cyberattacks, unauthorized access, or other malicious activities.

For additional information and instructions for enabling this feature, read about displaying IP addresses in the audit log for your organization.

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GitHub Enterprise Cloud customers can now join a private beta which allows API request events to be streamed as part of their enterprise audit log.

In this private beta, REST API calls against enterprise private repositories can be streamed to one of GitHub's supported streaming endpoints. Further iterations on this feature are planned to expand the API events captured and make this data available via the audit log API.

Many GitHub users leverage GitHub's APIs to extend and customize their GitHub experience. However, use of APIs can create unique security and operational challenges for Enterprises.

With the introduction of targeted audit log streaming API requests, Enterprise owners are now able to:

  • Better understand and analyze API usage targeting their private repositories;
  • Identify and diagnose potentially misconfigured applications or integrations;
  • Troubleshoot API activity targeting private repositories that may be contributing to API rate limiting; and
  • Develop API specific anomaly detection algorithms to identify potentially malicious activity.

Enterprise owners interested in participating in the private beta should reach out to your GitHub account manager or contact our sales team to have this feature enabled for your enterprise. Once enabled, you should begin seeing API request events in your audit log stream. Feedback can be provided at our beta feedback community discussion post.

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In January 2022, GitHub announced audit log streaming to AWS is generally available. By streaming the audit log for your enterprise, enterprises benefit from:

  • Data exploration: Examine streamed events using your preferred tool for querying large quantities of data. The stream contains both audit and Git events across the entire enterprise account.
  • Data continuity: Pause the stream for up to seven days without losing any audit data.
  • Data retention: Keep your exported audit logs and Git events data as long as you need to.

To expand on this offering, enterprises streaming their audit log to AWS S3 now have the ability to use AWS CloudTrail Lake integration to automatically consolidate and ingest GitHub audit logs into AWS Cloud Trail Lake. AWS CloudTrail Lake is a managed security and audit data lake that allows organizations to aggregate, immutably store, and query events. By deploying this integration in your own AWS account, AWS CloudTrail Lake will capture and provide tools to analyze GitHub audit log events using SQL-based queries.

To learn more, read our documentation on integrating with AWS CloudTrail Lake.

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GitHub Enterprise Cloud customers can now participate in a private beta displaying SAML single sign-on (SSO) identities for relevant users in audit log events.

SAML SSO gives organization and enterprise owners a way to control and secure access to resources like repositories, issues, and pull requests. Organization owners can invite GitHub users to join an organization backed by SAML SSO, allowing users to become members of the organization while retaining their existing identity and contributions on GitHub.

With the addition of SAML SSO identities in the audit log, organization and enterprise owners can easily link audit log activity with the user's corporate identity, used to SSO into GitHub.com. This not only provides increased visibility into the identity of the user, but also enables logs from multiple systems to quickly and easily be linked using a common SAML identity.

Enterprise owners interested in participating in the private beta should reach out to your GitHub account manager or contact our sales team to have this feature enabled for your enterprise. Once enabled, enterprise and organization owners can provide feedback at the logging SAML SSO authentication data for enterprise and org audit log events community discussion page.

See more